9780545326995I don’t often read graphic novels. Not because I don’t respect them; quite the contrary, actually. I think comic books and graphic novels are a great medium for reluctant and avid readers, but I do often recommend them to adults who are buying for a reluctant reader. Even as I say that, I realize that it sounds like I think graphic novels are easier or something. I don’t. It takes a lot of skill and patience to read text and illustrations, which is why I don’t often read graphic novels myself. Moreover, I think they are accessible to reluctant readers and are often overlooked, so I like to encourage people to consider them as a viable and respectable genre.

I’ve had the ARC for Drama, by Raina Telgemeier (Scholastic, $10.99) sitting on my bookshelves for a while now, but haven’t read it out of laziness. When it won a Stonewall honor award for the ALA recently, I was intrigued, especially since there is nothing on the cover or in the blurb that made that connection. What a surprise! First, I loved the reading experience. I think you have to get in the rhythm of graphic novels and because I don’t read a lot of them, I forget how to read them. But it didn’t take long before I got swept away. I’m sure I missed a lot of crucial parts of the illustrations, but I got better about taking the time to read them along with the text. Second, I was really taken aback by the pragmatic inclusion of the LBGTA plot lines. Callie loves theatre, but she’s discovered that she’s better behind the scenes than on the stage. She builds sets and props for her school’s drama productions. When she meets twins Jesse and Justin, she discovers two new recruits for the department. Justin craves the limelight and Jesse is perfectly happy to help Callie on the crew. When all the drama starts, during the final performance, Jesse shows that he is just as talented as Justin and also brave enough to push the boundaries of acting. Justin is relatively open about his sexuality. Jesse is more ambiguous. Callie stays pretty cool even in the midst of all the drama and by *not* turning this story into a romance, Telgemeier manages to focus the attention on Callie, her passion for theatre, and the value of friendship.

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